Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Russian serfs


This is Sergey Ivanov's painting A Peasant Leaving His Landlord on Yuri's Day. I think we will agree that the costumes are quite interesting.


7 comments:

  1. Stop being so damn coy.

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  2. Those don't like schtreimels, caftans, etc.?

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  3. Fotheringay-Phipps5:22 PM, March 23, 2011

    There's less to that than meets the eye. I don't think anyone in the world - even the most sheltered chassidisher guy out there - thinks that the chassidisher clothing has no relation at all to what the goyim wore at that time. The main question is whether it was adopted wholesale, or whether there were differences. There are clearly differences from the clothing in this picture, although it might be that that's just time. For example, the impression I get from old pictures is that streimels used to look more like the ones in this picture - raised in the middle - than the modern - sunk in the middle - look.

    One interesting thing is that this painter is from the late 19th century, at which time I think it's pretty much agreed that Jewish clothing was somewhat distinct.

    Also, people like to claim the Jewish clothing came about from aping Polish noblemen, not Russian serfs.

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  4. >Also, people like to claim the Jewish clothing came about from aping Polish noblemen, not Russian serfs.

    So, interesting, huh?

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  5. It's a little hard to tell, but I'm guessing that the figure on the left, who looks most like our idea of a Chasid, is the landlord and not the peasant. The Wiki article on "Yuri's Day" (linked to in the article on Ivanov) indicates that the action in the painting is probably taking place some time in the 1500's.

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  6. What's with the guy with תפילין on his legs?

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  7. >What's with the guy with תפילין on his legs?

    They're traditional Russian bast shoes - lapti

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